blogging kp!

some of my travels with random musings & silliness mixed in

The Hoop Dance May 29, 2011

This year for Memorial Weekend, I rode my Harley around Arizona. Part of my trip included riding up to the South Rim of the Grand Canyon. While walking around the Rim taking pictures, I heard the very distinct sound of what I will refer to here as powwow drums.

I walked over to where the sound was coming from (the side of the Hopi House) and found a show (ugh… I hate that word in this instance) of four or five Native American dancers performing various cultural dances… so, I slowly inched my way forward and soon was able to take some pictures. This series of photos is of the Hoop Dance.

The Hoop Dance is a form of dance that a solo dancer performs to tell a story with anywhere from 1 to 30 hoops at a time…. each formation of hoops can represent an animal (ie… snake, eagle, coyote) that is integral to the storytelling. Also, each hoop represents the circle of life. The various formations of the hoop occur all around the dancer’s body. To create the various formations, the hoops are arranged to interconnect. While interconnected, the hoops are extended from the dancer’s body to create the “wings”, “tails”, etc of the animal they are creating…. all this is done while the dance is moving very rapidly.

More of my pictures: http://wp.me/pyPkl-cO

 

Arizona Route 40/66 – Exit 303 Adamana January 3, 2011

He looks hungry!

I have to say that I LOVE the goofy old roadside attractions / stops that America offers along it’s highways and byways! One such area for satisfying my love of all things kooky…  is of course Route 66. Yes, you can get your kicks there… but on Highway 40 there is another place… Exit 303… Adamana.

Petrified wood… rocks… Native American wares… you name it…. but the best part is all the different ways the owners of these establishments have chosen to get your attention from the highway! Giant dinosaurs… teepees… giant Kachinas…

I was on the way to Las Vegas (the Nevada one) from Santa Fe, New Mexico, this past New Year’s and I had to stop… it was the time of day where the sun is directly overhead but I took some photos anyway!

Watching the cars go by.

See more of my photos:   http://wp.me/pyPkl-cU

 

Red Feather Development Group June 14, 2009

That so many people living in the 21st Century, in the richest country in the world, should be living in abject poverty, is a blot on American society. The Red Feather project is extremely important. It is culturally and environmentally sensitive; it has incredibly low overhead; it is truly making a difference. ~ Jane Goodall, PhD, DBE, UN Messenger of Peace

Okay… having shared what Ms. Goodall said… I am posting some info about The Red Feather Development Group... a charitable organization I donate to through United Way every year.

Please take the time to read and learn about this organization… Maybe you will be inspired to help give or build an environmentally friendly straw bale home with running water, electricity, and sanitation to a Native American family who does not have that which we take for granted on a daily basis.

Red Feather’s Philosophy
Cultural Sensitivity
Red Feather believes that tribal members know and understand what is best for their communities. Because they are the experts, we involve them in every aspect of our work, and we assist them in carrying out housing objectives that they deem important, rather than impose what we think is best for their community.

Partnerships
Building partnerships with reservation communities is the core of our programs. Our volunteers work side-by-side tribal members in the construction of each home, gaining an invaluable amount of trust and understanding of each other’s cultures. Our dedication to partnerships is far more valuable than any one person’s individual skills.

Empowerment
Red Feather’s top priority is community involvement. As explained in our mission statement, we believe that this is a key component in the goal to achieve substantial and lasting change on American Indian reservations. To this affect, a large portion of our commitment is spent towards empowerment.

Personal Enrichment
Red Feather volunteer opportunities combine service with real world learning. Volunteers routinely leave a project with a new appreciation for the host nation and its people. Many volunteers say that working with and getting to know the reservation community was a life changing experience.

 

Here is the link: www.redfeather.org


Canteyuke…
Generosity: to give, to share, to have a heart (Lakota)
Ho ya na… is to be noble; to be noble is to give. (Oneida)

 

George Carlin on Indians June 3, 2008

Filed under: Native American,Waxing Philosophic — photographingkp @ 5:18 pm
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“Now the Indians. I call them Indians because that’s what they are. They’re Indians. There’s nothing wrong with the word Indian. First of all, it’s important to know that the word Indian does not derive from Columbus mistakenly believing he had reached ‘India.’ India was not even called by that name in 1492; it was known as Hindustan.

More likely, the word Indian comes from Columbus’s description of the people he found here. He was an Italian, and did not speak or write very good Spanish, so in his written accounts he called the Indians, “Una gente in Dios.” A people in God. In God. In Dios. Indians. It’s a perfectly noble and respectable word.

As far as calling them ‘Americans’ is concerned, do I even have to point out what an insult this is? —– We steal their hemisphere, kill twenty or so million of them, destroy five hundred separate cultures, herd the survivors onto the worst land we can find, and now we want to name them after ourselves? It’s appalling. Haven’t we done enough damage? Do we have to further degrade them by tagging them with the repulsive name of their conquerors?

You know, you’d think it would be a fairly simple thing to come over to this continent, commit genocide, eliminate the forests, dam up the rivers, build our malls and massage parlors, sell our blenders and whoopee cushions, poison ourselves with chemicals, and let it go at that. But no. We have to compound the insult.”

And as far as these classroom liberals who insist on saying “Native American” are concerned, here’s something they should be told: It’s not up to you to name the people and tell them what they ought to be called. If you’d leave the classroom once in a while, you’d find that most Indians are insulted by the term Native American. The American Indian Movement will tell you that if you ask them.

The phrase “Native American” was invented by the U.S. government Department of the Interior in 1970. It is an inventory term used to keep track of people. It includes Hawaiians, Eskimos, Samoans, Micronesians, Polynesians, and Aleuts. Anyone who uses the phrase Native American is assisting the U.S. government in its effort to obliterate people’s true identities.

Do you want to know what the Indians would like to be called? Their real names: Adirondack, Delaware, Massachuset, Narranganset, Potomac, Illinois, Miami, Alabama, Ottawa, Waco, Wichita, Mohave, Shasta, Yuma, Erie, Huron, Susquehanna, Natchez, Mobile, Yakima, Wallawalla, Muskogee, Spokan, Iowa, Missouri, Omaha, Kansa, Biloxi, Dakota, Hatteras, Klamath, Caddo, Tillamook, Washoe, Cayuga, Oneida, Onondaga, Seneca, Laguna, Santa Ana, Winnebago, Pecos, Cheyenne, Menominee, Yankton, Apalachee, Chinook, Catawba, Santa Clara, Taos, Arapaho, Blackfoot, Blackfeet, Chippewa, Cree, Mohawk, Tuscarora, Cherokee, Seminole, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Comanche, Shoshone, Two Kettle, Sans Arc, Chiricahua, Kiowa, Mescalero, Navajo, Nez Perce, Potawatomi, Shawnee, Pawnee, Chickahominy, Flathead, Santee, Assiniboin, Oglala, Miniconjou, Osage, Crow, Brule, Hunkpapa, Pima, Zuni, Hopi, Paiute, Creek, Kickapoo, Ojibwa, Shinnicock.

I’m glad the Indians have gambling casinos now. It makes me happy that dimwitted white people are losing their rent money to the Indians. Maybe the Indians will get lucky and win their country back. Probably wouldn’t want it. Look at what we did to it.”

 

What is in a name?

Filed under: Native American,Waxing Philosophic — photographingkp @ 4:23 pm
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What’s In a Name?  Indian?  Native American?  American Indian?

“In the end, the term you choose to use (as an Indian or non Indian) is your own personal choice. Very few Indians that I know care either way. The recommended method is to refer to a person by their tribe, if that information is known.

The reason is that the Native peoples of North America are incredibly diverse. It would be like referring to both a Romanian and an Irishman as European. . . .

Whenever possible, most would prefer to be called a Cherokee or a Lakota or whichever tribe they belong to. This shows respect because not only are you sensitive to the fact that the terms Indian, American Indian, and Native American are an over simplification of a diverse ethnicity, but you also show that you listened when they told you what tribe they belonged to.

When you don’t know the specific tribe simply use the term which you are most comfortable using. The worst that can happen is that someone might correct you and open the door for a thoughtful debate on the subject of political correctness and its impact on ethnic identity. What matters in the long run is not which term is used but the intention with which it is used.”

by Christina Berry,  All Things Cherokee